Southwest Conference on Botanical Medicine 2019

March 29 – 31, 2019

Past Conference–next year’s dates: March 27 – 29, 2020. Thanks to all who made it such a success!
Audio recordings 
now available here. Distance-learning information for NDs and Nurses.


desert blooming ocotillo

Annual Conference at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (SCNM) in Tempe, Arizona, March 29 – 31, 2019. See speakers and topics below.

Highlights: Over 35 lectures to choose from, two Friday field studies, and a pre-conference intensive on Neurological and Cognitive Decline with Jason Miller, DACM, LAc.  Schedule

Continuing education: Applications approved for naturopathic physicians (California, Arizona and Oregon), nurses and acupuncturists. See below for continuing education details.

Location: SCNM 2140 E. Broadway Rd. Tempe, Arizona 85282. Conference phone: 541-482-3016.

Registration: $325 by February 20; $395 after that date.
Includes all lectures on March 30 & 31. Extra fees for Friday events, meals and lodging.

Online registration and phone registration are now closed.

You are welcome to register at the door.

Registration information

botanical medicine conference features
Intensive Workshops on Friday, March 29 
  • Pre-conference Intensive: 1 – 5:15 PM. Jason Miller, DACM, LAc Neurological and Cognitive Decline — Integrating Traditional Solutions with the Latest Research on Brain Function 
  • Friday Field Studies: 8 AM – Noon with John Slattery (FULL); 8 AM – Noon with Phyllis Hogan, and  2 – 6 PM with Feather Jones (Still a few spaces)

Details on Friday Events

Conference March 30 & 31: 

The latest research on botanical therapies plus herb walks and medicine making classes. Lectures include:

  • Useful Syndromes from Chinese Herbalism for the Western Herbalist
  • The Role of Bitter Herbs for a Healthy Microbiome
  • Beyond Cholesterol: Investigating the Role of Testosterone, Calcium, and Inflammation in Cardiovascular Disease
  • Naturopathic Strategies for Patients with Exposure to Molds and Mycotoxins
  • The Obesity Epidemic: Hormonal and Metabolic Disruption as Underlying Causes
  • Topical Applications for Pain Management
  • Acute Opiate Withdrawal – An Herbal Protocol
  • Migraines, an in-depth look at their pathophysiology and differential treatment
  • Understanding Biological Aging and Diversity: Theories, Concepts, Important Biomarkers, and Botanical and Nutritional Solutions (2-part lecture)

Lecture Descriptions: Friday, Saturday, and Sunday

List of speakers and topics


herbal conference lodging

Location: Southwest Conference on Botanical Medicine

SCNM herbal conference
The Commons– Recently completed addition to SCNM. All natural sustainable building materials. Solar powered by panels covering the parking lot

Address: 2140 E. Broadway Rd, Tempe, Arizona

One of the first college campuses constructed with sustainable / green building techniques, Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (SCNM) provides an ideal learning environment: comfortable indoor classrooms and an herb garden for outdoor lectures and meals.  In October, 2016, the new Commons building (pictured right) received LEED Platinum Green certification for promoting renewable energy, saving resources and having a positive impact on the health of its occupants.

What makes SCNM such a great place for an herbal conference?


Hotel: Embassy Suites, Tempe

lodging for herbal conference
Embassy Suites, Tempe, AZ

Just minutes away from SCNM, Embassy Suites offers two-room suites beginning at $139/night (plus tax). (800) 305-1369. Group #SBA. Discount good until March 1. The hotel still has a few rooms but the discount has expired.

NEW! Register for your room online. It only takes two minutes.
Hotel address: 4400 S. Rural Rd, Tempe, AZ 85282
Local phone: (480) 897-7444

Lodging includes complimentary:

  • Airport transportation
  • Van service from hotel to SCNM
  • Made-to-order hot breakfast with omelet station
  • Evening reception with drinks and snacks
  • Free WiFi in all rooms (ignore mention of a charge in online reservation–it’s free)

Friday March 29: Pre-conference Events

8:00 AM – Noon
NEW! Field Study — Lower Holbert Trail, South Mountain Park
Phyllis Hogan
Join ethnobotanist and herbalist Phyllis Hogan as she takes you back to ancient times with views of petroglyphs and medicinal plants that have been used by native peoples for centuries. This trail offers an easy stroll in the early morning desert light, with plenty of stops along the way to find and learn about identification, harvesting techniques and preparation of desert medicinals.($65) Read More

8:00 AM – Noon (Sorry this Field Study is now FULL)
Field Study in the Superstition Wilderness near Lost Dutchman State Park
John Slattery
Join bioregional herbalist John Slattery for a walk through a diverse Sonoran desert landscape where multiple habitats converge. We focus on direct observation of plants and receptivity to knowledge and healing that comes directly from the plants. John has been developing these exercises and this approach to working with wild plants for over a decade. This year he will investigate the riparian areas near the First Water Trailhead. ($65) Read More

1:00 – 5:15 PM 
Pre-conference Intensive: Neurological and Cognitive Decline — Integrating Traditional Solutions with the Latest Research on Brain Function
Jason Miller, DACM, LAc
This intensive explores neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. It includes an inquiry into genetic markers associated with disease occurrence rates, internal terrain markers associated with catabolic/anabolic imbalance, inflammation, stress hormones and reproductive hormone deficiency. We also examine the influence of chronic and acute stress, environmental toxins, diet, lifestyle, genetics and pharmaceuticals on cognitive function, followed by botanical solutions from ancient tradition and modern science. ($85) Read more.

2:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Field Study at the Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park in Globe, AZ
Feather Jones
Discover the diversity, the intricate beauty and many faces of Arizona at the Boyce Thompson Arboretum, the oldest and largest botanical gardens in the southwest. Focus is on the rich tapestry of folk botany; traditional uses along with the supporting science. ($65 + $15 admission to the park) Read more

 

Saturday March 30

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Registration: SCNM Academic Building Lobby
8:30 AM – 9:15 AM  Opening Meeting: Speaker Introductions and Welcome
 – SCNM Academic Building

9:30 AM – 11:00 AM (Concurrent lectures–choose one–no need to sign up in advance.)
Beyond Cholesterol: Investigating the Role of Inflammation, Testosterone, and Calcium Regulation in Cardiovascular Disease
Jason Miller, DACM, LAc
In addition to lipid imbalances, some of the key factors underlying CVD include inflammation, oxidative damage, hypercoagulation, low androgen levels, and arterial calcification. This lecture investigates each of these factors in detail. How inflammatory signaling directs immune function, and is tied to both coagulation and oxidative damage; how chronic stress is tied to an inflammatory cascade that leads to endothelial damage, immune dysregulation, and arteriosclerosis. How low levels of circulating androgens, especially testosterone and DHEAs, are associated with CVD mortality. And how calcium dysregulation stems from the over-consumption of calcium, poor digestion, and imbalances in vitamin D, vitamin K and parathyroid hormone levels.

Based on this new research, a program using diet, exercise, botanical medicine, nutrition, and stress-relieving therapies, can often prevent CVD without the unwanted side effects associated with biomedical intervention. In difficult cases, botanical medicine can work synergistically with pharmaceutical interventions, reducing required doses and preventing side effects.

White Ratany herbal
White Ratany, (Krameria bicolor) by Mimi Kamp

Topical Applications for Pain Management
Jill Stansbury, ND
With the opiate epidemic being a glaring example of how NOT to manage chronic and acute pain, this session explores what tools herbalists possess to help comfort and palliate acutely painful conditions effectively. Drawing from both folklore and modern research, this class offers instruction on preparing topical applications to manage pain. The last 15 minutes of the class time will be reserved for participants to share their own tools for effective pain management.

Thyroid Disorders, the Underlying Causes, and their Effective Treatment with Natural Remedies
David Winston, RH (AHG)
This presentation addresses underlying causes and botanical protocols for hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and autoimmune thyroid diseases (Graves disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis).

Bridging Herbalism, Aromatherapy, and Flower Essences for Healing (Outdoors in the Garden)
Rhonda PallasDowney
Chaparral, Yucca, Pinyon and Palo Santo all offer a natural method of healing and cleansing, affecting us physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually. Their use ranges from the medicinal use of a plant as a source of nourishment and replenishment to more sacred uses for spiritual healing.

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Refreshments and Exhibit Break

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Understanding Biological Aging and Diversity: Theories, Concepts, Important Biomarkers, and Botanical and Nutritional Solutions, Part 1
Donald Yance
Increased life expectancy and a larger number of older people living with chronic disease will affect our lives and the life of each person we know. The regular medical paradigm regards the diseases of aging as individual maladies to be treated with pharmaceuticals. Part 1 discusses the chronic diseases of aging, and the frailty syndrome that accompanies them, which are now thought to be the norm. Causes include diet, lifestyle, accumulated stress and pharmaceutical side effects. New research indicates that aging is a condition treatable with broad-reaching, multi-adaptive health-promoting botanical and nutritional medicine. These are discussed in Part 2.

Cultivating Focus and Attention in Kids with Botanical Medicine
Mary Bove, ND
Kids develop focus, attention and memory as they mature and develop their learning skills. Mind exercises and challenges can help and so can herbs. This presentation includes descriptions of kid-friendly ways to use herbs to cultivate focus and attention, including food recipes, beverages, aromas and therapeutic preparations to support brain health, for short and long-term applications in kids of all ages.

Nutritive Herbs: Essential Therapeutics for a Nutrient-Deprived World
Paul Bergner
Mineral and trace element components of medicinal plants are the forgotten constituents in contemporary herbalism, yet they are essential in an overall therapeutic plan for the exhausted and malnourished patient. This presentation covers the roles of mineral and trace elements in maintaining health, their disappearance from the American diet in the last fifty years, and presents forms and recipes from the materia medica to assist in their restoration.

Goldpoppy
Goldpoppy

Osha: Bear Medicine of the West (In the SCNM herb garden)
Feather Jones
As a keystone plant species, Osha, Ligusticum porteri, has always played a necessary role in traditional medicine. Although it is abundant in many areas, it is still locally overharvested. Learn about sustainability techniques to preserve this wild medicine, and investigate the medicinal qualities of this revered plant. Make an antiviral respiratory syrup with take-home samples.

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Lunch (with pre-paid ticket) and Exhibit Break

 

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM
Understanding Biological Aging and Diversity: Theories, Concepts, Important Biomarkers, and Botanical and Nutritional Solutions, Part 2
Donald Yance
Experts now suggest a second path for aging, one that focuses on building robustness, resilience, and efficiency of autotrophic regulation. Botanical and nutritional medicine have been proven to support the preservation, protection and restoration of health. Recent data are presented on specific biological age-related biomarkers including telomerase, inflammation, oxidation (free radical damage), hormones, (blood, lymph and oxygen), stagnation and specific nutrient deficiencies that are associated with health decline and chronic disease, along with botanical and nutritional therapies to help reverse the decline.

Useful Syndromes from Chinese Herbalism for the Western Herbalist
Paul Bergner
The therapeutic paradigms of Chinese syndrome patterns may at first seem irrelevant or difficult to apply for the Western herbalist. Chinese medicine offers a language which enables the recognition of patterns universally present in patients in the West. This allows the Western herbalist to more intelligently address these imbalances with our own traditional Western methods.

Herbal treatments for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause
Katie Stage, ND
Genitourinary syndrome of menopause describes a group of symptoms commonly occurring during menopause, including vaginal dryness and pain, prolapse, incontinence, and bladder infections. Treatment can dramatically improve a woman’s quality of life. This presentation contrasts non-drug, herbal and lifestyle treatments with pharmaceutical protocols.

Demonstration: Musculoskeletal Injuries – From First Aid to Herbal Healing (In the SCNM Herb Garden)
Sam Coffman
Discusses treatment of wounds, sprains, bruises and musculoskeletal pain. Learn a few critical first aid gems using sports and kinesiology tape, as well as a short demonstration on closed-tissue injury poultices. Herbal protocols that help the body move more quickly through the inflammation and proliferation stages of wound healing are also presented.

3:30 PM – 4:00 PMbotanicals
Refreshments and Exhibit Break

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Deciphering the Medicinal Properties of Immune Modulatory Botanicals in Comparison to Pharmaceutical Therapies
Jeffrey Langland, PhD
Great controversy still remains as to whether Echinacea purperea is actually an effective cold and flu remedy. The first part of this presentation illustrates the antiviral and immune modulatory effects of varying Echinacea extracts in vitro and discusses therapeutic implications in relation to antihistamines and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals.

The second section presents findings on the active constituents and physiological responses associated with Astragalus membranaceus, including immune cell activation, inflammatory responses and blood pressure modulation, compared to conventional pharmaceuticals including immune adjuvants and antiviral immune therapeutic drugs (interferon, interleukins etc).

The Obesity Epidemic: Hormonal and Metabolic Disruption as Underlying Causes
Kenneth Proefrock, ND
A segment of the populaiton experiences persistent weight gain or inability to lose weight that proves unrelated to their dietary and exercise habits. These are the people who have a regular schedule of aerobic exercise and weight training, are consuming a low carbohydrate, moderate fat and higher protein diet and are still unable to alter their body fat. The solution for many of these patients begins with an understanding of the relationship between the digestive system and the nervous and hormonal systems of the body, and botanical medicine and nutritional strategies born from an understanding of the body and the mind as a whole unit.

Migraines: An In-depth Look at their Pathophysiology
David Winston, RH (AHG)
This lecture proposes an updated evaluation and treatment program for migraine headaches which draws heavily on Traditional Chinese Medicine principles and botanicals. Different classes of migraines demand different treatment strategies, and starting with a diagnostic evaluation, the presentation covers botanicals for each unique type of migraine, along with dietary, nutritional and physical therapy recommendations.

Night Blooming Cereus
Night Blooming Cereus

Flower and Plant Essences: How to Prepare, How to Read and How to Use Them (In the SCNM herb garden)
Mimi Kamp
We discuss various methods of making and preserving plant essences. After sitting (attuning) with one plant in the garden and discussing our various experiences, we will, as a group, make an essence with that species. (Participants may take home a stock bottle of that essence if desired)

Herb Walk at the Desert Botanical Garden ($25 admission to garden)
Phyllis Hogan
The spring bloom is usually spectacular in this 145-acre preserve offering over 4,000 desert plant species. Learn to identify the medicinal plants of the desert and how to use them for medicine. Reserve your spot in advance when you arrive at conference registration on Saturday. Carpools leave from SCNM at 3:40 PM.

5:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Dinner and Exhibit Break

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Panel Discussion: Botanicals and Immunotherapy in Cancer Therapeutics
Jason Miller, Kenneth Proefrock, and Donald Yance
This presentation begins with a discussion of the pharmacology, benefits and potential side effects of immunotherapy drugs and a description of their clinical applications in lung cancer, metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma and other pathologies. Botanicals and selected nutrients can work with immunotherapy to enhance effectiveness and mitigate side effects. Includes a discussion of preventing herb/drug interactions with dosing schedules, and presents supporting research on synergistic effects.

Sunday March, 31

8:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Herb Walk at the Desert Botanical Garden (25 minute drive, $25 admission to the garden)
Mimi Kamp
Early morning exploration of this beautiful garden reveals towering columnar cacti and the feathery shade and colorful beauty of exotic species. Discover their unique medicinal qualities, learn sustainable harvesting techniques and the best medicine preparation.

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM
The Role of Botanical Medicine in Pain and Inflammation: Botanical analgesics and modulators of the inflammatory cascade

Jason Miller, DACM, LAc
Chronic inflammation is a persistent, dysfunctional inflammatory response. It damages cells and tissues, disrupts cell-signaling networks, and can predispose a person to autoimmune conditions or other chronic disease. Chronic inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of many conditions including atherosclerosis, arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cancer, stroke, chronic pain, periodontal disease, neurodegenerative conditions and cardiovascular disease. Inflammation and pain are nearly always associated with each other. This lecture investigates the subjective nature of pain, its relation to inflammation, and the treatment of inflammation and pain with traditional Chinese medicine principles and herbs, supported by the latest biomedical research.

Herbs for Restoring Gut Mucosal Health and Function
Mary Bove, ND
Restoration of the gut mucosa and intestinal barrier with botanicals can offer specific support for mucosal immunity, cell regeneration and encouraging a healthy biome. Mucosal barrier and secretions are compromised with food allergies, stress, inflammatory gut issues and many systemic diseases. This presentation describes specific botanicals, their application and use in restoring mucosal immunity and health. Discusses traditional use, more science-based use and clinical applications in case histories.

Differential Treatment of Depression and Anxiety
David Winston, RH (AHG)
Research shows that the orthodox treatment of depression and anxiety is often not very effective. This class discusses the latest findings on the underlying causes of depression and anxiety. Learn to differentiate and appropriately treat the many different types of depression and anxiety including hepatic and GI based depression, hormonal depression, stagnant depression, old age-induced depression , panic disorder, GI based anxiety and generalized anxiety disorder.

Passionflower
Passionflower

Wild Fermentation (Garden Lecture)
John Slattery
Fermentation is wild! And, yes, it’s naturally occurring… all around us, and within us. In this workshop, John demonstrates the basics of lacto-fermentation, wild yeast starters, and a step-by-step process to achieve unique, tasty, and healthful combinations from a variety of fruits. We look at some of the healing properties of fruits as they transform through the process of fermentation. Herbs can also be utilized in various forms during the fermentation process, including traditional preparations of mugwort, yarrow and hops.

10:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Refreshments and Exhibit Break

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Medication Induced Cognitive Decline
Kenneth Proefrock, ND
Dementia and delirium are known to be associated with drug toxicity from agents like anticholinergic medications, psychoactive drugs, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent are the first steps for the prevention of drug-induced dementia and delirium. Most of the clinical circumstances that result in the prescription of a potentially toxic drug can be addressed through lifestyle changes, botanical medicine and nutritional intervention.

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
Jill Stansbury, ND
Nerve damage in advanced diabetes is a stubborn problem and one with few effective remedies. This presentation explores vascular and neuroprotective herbs to consider for neuropathy, and details current research on herbal medicines to include in therapeutic strategies.

Biofilms and Botanical Medicine
Sam Coffman
The discovery of biofilms has opened a new frontier in understanding the health of the human body. Biofilms function in ways that can be beneficial or harmful. They play a role in antibiotic resistance, chronic infection and even chronic inflammation. Botanical medicine offers a number of possibilities to disrupt biofilms, which are presented in case studies on infections in the gut, urinary tract and respiratory tract.

Herbal Pairs: Stepping Stones to Compounding (SCNM Herb Garden)
JoAnn Sanchez
This class is an interactive, experiential, hands-on sampling of herbal pairs. Many samples, all from the SCNM herb garden, are provided for tasting and experiencing this concept of herbal formulation.

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Lunch and Exhibit Break

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM
Acute Opiate Withdrawal: An Herbal Protocol
Jillian Stansbury, ND
Many people who rely on opiate medication or use heroin are trapped into continuing use to prevent the agony of acute withdrawal from such substances. Opiate use actually heightens pain, necessitating larger and larger doses. Cessation triggers a landslide of neurologic consequences from sweating, to nausea and vomiting, to agonizing physical discomfort, and mental and emotional irritability. Herbs can do wonders to soothe this brutal process; Dr. Stansbury shares her protocol for withdrawal.

botanical

The Role of Bitter Herbs for a Healthy Microbiome
Mary Bove, ND
Bitter herbs and the bitter action are central to herbal medicine and to optimizing digestive function while supporting a healthy microbiome. The role of the bitter action is applicable in many digestive conditions including gastric ulcer, IBD, SIBO, indigestion, food allergies and leaky gut. This class looks at the application of bitter herbs, specific bitter herbs and active constituents, along with microbiome support and health. Case history examples are included.

 

Preventing Adulterants in Our Botanical Medicine
Mark Blumenthal
In this lecture, Mark describes the sources of botanical adulterants and the herbs where they are most often found, with remedies for the future. He also speaks about the new Sustainable Herbs Program, which is dedicated to making the source and processing of botanicals more transparent.

Artisan Essential Oil Distillation and Medicinal Uses (Demonstration in the SCNM Herb Garden)
Eric Scott Bresselsmith
Begins with a demonstration of a table-top essential oil distillation system and describes the basics of distilling. Discusses practical applications of fractionated essential oils and their connection to natural flavor/fragrance, contrasting them with petroleum distillation and artificial flavor/fragrance. Differences between hydrosols, essential oils and steeped teas are included.

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Refreshments and Exhibit Break

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Naturopathic Strategies for Patients with Exposure to Molds and Mycotoxins
Kenneth Proefrock, ND
Mold and mycotoxin exposure related to flooding and global weather shifting is definitely on the rise. The presence of toxic indoor molds with accompanying bacterial overgrowth is clearly detrimental to human health. Here we discuss the idea that mold-related illness exists in multiple facets; it is not simply a transient mucosal irritation with increased risk of asthma onset or exacerbation.  The varying effects can include neurological symptoms, skin rashes, irritation of the mucous membranes, and long-term exposure can lead to development of multiple chemical sensitivities. Naturopathic techniques to reduce or remove the associated symptoms are presented.

The Health Benefits of Chocolateherbal medicine
Katie Stage, ND
The beloved herb and food, Theobroma cacao, or chocolate, has many positive effects on health. This session discusses various preparations of chocolate and their specific benefits for cardiometabolic and respiratory conditions, in contrast to commonly prescribed pharmaceuticals for these conditions. We also explore sustainability and quality issues of chocolate in commerce. Samples provided.

Nutrition in the Herbal Paradigm
Paul Bergner
Dietetics and nutrition have long been essential elements of a therapeutic plan for medical herbalists. Individual macro and micronutrients may be viewed as possessing actions identical to those of medicinal plants, such as tonic, adaptogenic, antispasmodic, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory etc. We discuss nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and other special nutrients in terms of what their actions would be if they were plants.

Drought and Climate Change in the High Desert of Northern Arizona (SCNM Herb Garden)
Phyllis Hogan
A bioregional focus on some of the prominent drought-resistant medicinals that seem to be thriving despite the changes in climate.

5:30 PM –5:45 PM
Closing Meeting (SCNM Herb Garden)

Online and phone registration are now closed. 
You are welcome to register at the door.
 

Paul Bergner

Paul Bergner is the Director of the North American Institute of Medical Herbalism in Portland, Oregon, where he offers seminar training in clinical skills, medical herbalism, nutrition, and nature cure. He supervised a teaching clinic in Boulder, Colorado from 1996 until 2012, has edited the Medical Herbalism Journal since 1989, and is the author of seven books on herbal medicine.

Presentations:
1. Nutritive Herbs: Essential Therapeutics for a Nutrient-Deprived World
2. Useful Syndromes from Chinese Herbalism for the Western Herbalist
3. Nutrition in the Herbal Paradigm

Mark Blumenthal

The founder and executive director of the American Botanical Council and the editor and publisher of HerbalGram (an international, peer-reviewed quarterly journal), Mark has written hundreds of articles and appears on national radio and TV.

Presentations:
1. The Latest Research on Botanical Adulterants

Mary Bove, ND

A clinical medical herbalist, Mary Bove had a practice in family medicine in Brattleboro, Vermont for over 20 years. She is the author of An Encyclopedia of Natural Healing for Children and Infants, and recently produced an iPhone App, Momma Nature’s Food Pharm Guide. She is currently the botanical educator for Gaia Herbs, Inc.

Presentations:
1. Herbs for Restoring Gut Mucosal Health and Function
2. The Role of Bitter Herbs for a Healthy Microbiome
3. Cultivating Focus and Attention in Kids with Botanical Medicine

April Desert Bloom
Brittlebush and Cholla Cactus in bloom in April in the Sonoran Desert

Eric Scott Bresselsmith

Eric has pursued an interest in botanical medicine and aromatherapy since the 1980s. After a wide range of self-study, his focus centered on essential oils and specifically those in his own backyard in rural Utah. For over ten years he has been dedicated to the distillation and practical applications of high-quality essential oils in his family business, House of Aromatics in Boulder, Utah

Presentations:
1. Demonstration: Artisan Essential Oil Distillation and Medicinal Uses

Sam Coffman

A former army special forces medic, Sam Coffman is the founder and director of The Human Path, where he teaches botanical medicine, western pathophysiology, physiology, integrative medicine, austere and post-disaster medicine. He has taught herbalism for over 25 years, and been a clinical herbalist for over 15 years. He is also the co-founder of Herbal Medics, which brings medicine for indigenous, local residents in remote areas. This organization has assisted with first aid and herbal first aid support at numerous gatherings and protests, as well as post-disaster medical and botanical medicine clinics along the Texas coastline and in Houston during hurricane Harvey.

Presentations:
1. Demonstration: Musculoskeletal Injuries – From First Aid to Herbal Healing
2. Biofilms and Botanical Medicine

Phyllis Hogan

The owner of Winter Sun Trading Company in Flagstaff, Phyllis Hogan founded the Arizona Ethnobotanical Research Association (AERA) to investigate, document and preserve native plant usage in the Southwest. She teaches ethnobotany programs for the Navajo & other tribes.

Presentations:
1. Drought-Resistant Medicinals in the High Desert of Northern Arizona: Thriving in the Face of Climate Change
2. Herb Walk Desert Botanical Garden (25 minute drive, $25 admission to Garden)

Feather Jones

Feather Jones has been practicing herbal medicine for over 35 years, and integrates herbal remedies, holistic nutrition, flower essences and stress reduction guidance. She is a Botanical Field Guide at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and has served twice on the Board of Directors for the American Herbalists Guild. Feather is an herbal consultant for the natural products industry and has an ongoing year-long herbal apprenticeship program. A desert woman at heart, she spends many hours on the trails near Sedona. She owns and lovingly created the organic herbal formulas for Sedona Tea Blends that provide a wellness tea for body, mind and spirit.

Presentations:
1. Field Study at Boyce Thompson Arboretum 2 – 6 PM Friday March 29 (Cost $65 + Admission to Arboretum $15)
2. Garden Lecture and Demonstration: Osha: Bear Medicine of the West

Mimi Kamp

Mimi Kamp has been making plant medicine in the Southwest for over 35 years.  Her field classes and presentations emphasize habitat, sustainability, Mexican and ethnobotanical usage, and direct perception and communication with the plants themselves. She is a well-known botanical illustrator and photographer.

Presentations:
1. Demonstration in the Garden: Flower and Plant Essences: How to Make Them and How to Apply them.
2. Herb Walk Desert Botanical Garden (25 minute drive, $25 admission to Garden)

Jeffrey Langland, PhD

Jeffrey Langland has spent much of his career investigating complex cellular defenses and immune responses against microorganisms, and comparing similarities between plant and human defenses against viruses. As a full professor and chair of the research department at SCNM, he brings new insight and innovative approaches to research for students in the field of naturopathic medicine.

Presentation:
1. Deciphering the Medicinal Properties of Immune Modulatory Botanicals in Comparison to Pharmaceutical Therapies

Jason Miller, DACM, LAc

Jason Miller practices botanical and nutritional medicine, acupuncture, and Asian bodywork at his clinic, Jade Mountain Medicine in Ashland, Oregon. He recently received his doctorate in acupuncture and oriental medicine (DACM) after completing a master’s degree in acupuncture and Oriental medicine and completed a postgraduate internship at the “House of Celebrity Doctors” in Nanjing, China. His approach bridges the frameworks of traditional and modern medicine in the management of chronic disease.

Presentations:
1. Intensive: Neurological and Cognitive Decline — Integrating Traditional Solutions with The Latest Research on Brain Function ($85)
2. Beyond Cholesterol: Investigating the Role of Testosterone, Calcium, and Inflammation in Cardiovascular Disease
3. Botanical Medicine in Pain and Inflammation
4. Panel: Immunotherapy in Cancer Therapeutics and Botanical Medicine

Rhonda PallasDowney

The founder of Living Flower Essences and The Center for Plant Studies and Healing Arts in Cottonwood, Arizona, Rhonda is an herbalist and flower essence practitioner who teaches herbal studies, plant life and healing journeys in nature. She is the author of Voices of Flowers and The Healing Power of Flowers.

Presentation:
1. Bridging Herbalism, Aromatherapy, and Flower Essences for Healing: Chaparral, Yucca, Pinyon and Palo Santo (SCNM herb garden)

Kenneth Proefrock, ND

A Naturopathic Doctor practicing in Sun City, Arizona, He is the vice-president of the North American Board of Naturopathic Examiners and chair of the biochemistry portion of the naturopathic physician’s licensing exam.

Presentations:
1. Naturopathic Strategies for Patients with Exposure to Molds and Mycotoxins
2. Medication Induced Cognitive Decline
3. The Obesity Epidemic: Hormonal and Metabolic Disruption as Underlying Causes
4. Panel: Immunotherapy in Cancer Therapeutics and Botanical Medicine

JoAnn Sanchez

JoAnn Sanchez is the director of the herbalist training program at Southwest Institute of Healing Arts in Scottsdale (a 700-hour diploma program), for which she has recently published five textbook manuals. She teaches at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine, where she also tends the medicine garden.

Presentation:
1. Herbal Pairs: Stepping Stones to Compounding (Demonstration in the SCNM Herb Garden)

Yucca in Bloom
Yucca in Bloom

John Slattery

John is a bioregional herbalist helping people develop relationship with wild plants. He founded Desert Tortoise Botanicals in 2005 which offers wildharvested plant medicines to the people of the Southwest. He maintains a clinical practice in Tucson, AZ and offers plant walks, foraging expeditions, field trips into Sonora, Mexico, and his annual Sonoran Herbalist Apprenticeship Program.

Presentations:
1. Field Study in Superstition Wilderness near Lost Dutchman State Park ($65) Admission free to trail. (FULL)
2. Wild Medicine Fermentation (Demonstration in the SCNM herb garden)

Katie Stage , RH (AHG), ND

Katie Stage is a naturopathic physician practicing at the SCNM clinic in Tempe. She is a full-time faculty member at SCNM, teaching botanical medicine, hydrotherapy, GYN lab, and clinical skills. She also teaches Mayan healing techniques.

Presentation:
1. Herbal Treatments for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause
2. The Health Benefits of Chocolate

Jill Stansbury, ND

A naturopathic doctor, Jill Stansbury specializes in women’s health, mental health, and chronic disease. She teaches on the faculty of National College of Naturopathic Medicine, where she was chair of the botanical medicine department for 25 years. She travels extensively in the Peruvian Amazon to study indigenous healers and their herbs.

Presentations:
1. Topical Applications for Pain Management
2. Acute Opiate Withdrawal – An Herbal Protocol
3. Botanical Approaches to Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Claret Cup Cactus
Claret Cup Cactus by Mimi Kamp

David Winston, RH (AHG)

David Winston is an herbalist and ethnobotanist with over 40 years of training and clinical experience in Cherokee, Chinese and Western/Eclectic herbal traditions. He offers a two year clinical training program in botanical medicine at David Winston’s Center for Herbal Studies and is the founder and president of Herbalist and Alchemist, Inc.

Presentations:
1. Differential Treatment of Depression and Anxiety
2. Thyroid disorders, the underlying causes, and their effective treatment with natural remedies
3. Migraines, an in-depth look at their pathophysiology and differential treatment

Donald Yance, RH (AHG)

An herbalist and certified nutritionist, Donald Yance practices at the Mederi Centre for Natural Healing in Ashland, Oregon, where he specializes in the treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. He is the founder and president of the Mederi Foundation, a nonprofit organization for professional education and clinical research in integrative medicine, and president and formulator of Natura Health Products.

Presentations:
1. Understanding Biological Aging and Diversity: Theories, Concepts, Important Biomarkers, and Botanical and Nutritional Solutions, Part 1
2. Understanding Biological Aging and Diversity: Theories, Concepts, Important Biomarkers, and Botanical and Nutritional Solutions, Part 2
4. Panel: Immunotherapy in Cancer Therapeutics and Botanical Medicine


botanical conference banner

Registration Fees and Information

Registration: $325 by February 20; $395 after that.

Online and phone registration are now closed. 
You are welcome to register at the door.
 

Location: SCNM 2140 E. Broadway Rd. Tempe, Arizona 85282. Conference phone: 541-482-3016.

Directions to registration: Drive past the new SCNM building to the parking lot with the solar panels. The Academic Building is next to the parking lot behind the new building. (This is where we’ve always held the conference.) Go in the front entrance and registration is inside the door.

Arrive by 8:00 AM Saturday March 30 to register. You may also sign up for the pre-conference intensive at the door on Friday March 29 at 12:30 PM, if you are also registered for the whole conference.

Phone 541-482-3016

Cancellations: Before March 15, registration fees will be refunded minus $50 processing per registrant. No refunds can be given after 3/15/19. Refund requests should be sent in writing or by email to the conference office.
Lodging

Embassy Suites, Tempe:
Rooms start at $139/night plus tax. (800) 305-1369. Group #SBA. Discount good until March 1.
NEW! Register for your room online. It only takes two minutes.

Lodging includes complimentary:
-Airport transportation
-Van service from hotel to SCNM.
-Made to order hot breakfast with omelet station
-Evening reception with drinks and snacks.
-Free WiFi in all rooms.

Transportation

The closest airport is Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX). If you are flying to Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix, van service is complimentary to the Embassy Suites in Tempe. Call the front desk 480-897-7444 when you arrive and they will send the van for you. For other airport transportation, use the SuperShuttle.

If you are driving, the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (SCNM) is located at 2140 E. Broadway Rd in Tempe, AZ (on the north side of East Broadway, just west of the intersection of Price and E. Broadway).

Continuing Education
Milk Thistle by Patricia Gaines, ND

Applications approved for CME, CNE, PDA and CEUs. Number of credits depends on which lectures are attended. To earn the maximum 21.5 credits you need to attend both Friday morning and afternoon events (except for Oregon NDs–no credit for field studies)

• Naturopathic Physicians

California ND: application approved for 21.5 hours by CNDA, of which 11.5 can be pharmacy. Includes attendance at Friday events. Extra $35 fee for California ND CME. See California CE application details here.

Arizona ND: Application approved for 21.5 possible general hours of which 11.5 can be pharmacy, (or 10 pharm and 1.5 opiate addiction). Includes attendance at Friday events.  CE Details

Oregon ND: application approved for 17.5 possible general hours of which 11.5 can be pharmacy for selected lectures. Includes attendance at Friday pre-conference intensive. CE Details

• Acupuncturists
Application approved for 21.5 PDA (hours) to NCCAOM, which includes attendance at Friday morning and afternoon events. View Acupuncture CE application details.

NEW for California Acupuncturists! The Southwest Conference has just been approved by the California Board of Acupuncture for 21.5 Category 1 CE hours for this event. CEP #1552

Nurses
Application approved for 21.75 contact hours in nursing. Includes attendance at Friday events and all lectures at the weekend event (not just selected lectures). Extra $35 fee due to high cost of new application.
This continuing education activity has been approved by the Continuing Education Nursing Group (formerly the Western Multi-State Division) an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. .
Details here: Nursing CE contact hours

• A certificate of attendance is available to any participant who requests it

 

Lecture Notes

Lecture notes are compiled into an online book (proceedings) which is available to all registrants at no cost. Around the middle of March, registrants will be sent a link and password to access the teacher materials. Printed books are also available for $20 at the conference ($30 afterwards).

 

We thank Mimi Kamp for the desert photos on this page, and especially the cover photo of the ocotillo in bloom (Fouquieria splendens).  Her keen eye and close-up lense help us to see the desert in a whole new light! Thank you Mimi!

 



Exhibitors

herbal conference Exhibit Hall

Please contact us if you are interested in exhibiting.

Registration includes a table for exhibiting and selling products or services and two conference registrations.

 

 


Thank You!

Frontier Logo

 

Thank you to Frontier Natural Foods Co-op for their sponsorship of this online brochure. We thank Frontier for their continued annual support, and especially for making this page possible.

 


conference schedule

FRIDAY, MARCH 29
8:00 AM – NoonField Study—John Slattery Superstition Mountains ($65) FULLField Study—Phyllis Hogan South Mountain Park ($65) (Still room)
1:00 PM - 5:15 PMPre-conference intensive: Neurological and Cognitive Decline Jason Miller ($85)
2:00 PM – 6:00 PMField Study—Feather Jones Boyce Thompson Arboretum ($65 + $15 admission to park)
SATURDAY, MARCH 30
7:30 AM -
8:30 AM
Registration- Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine – Lobby
8:30 AM -
9:15 AM
Welcome- SCNM Auditorium
9:30 AM -
11:00 AM
Cardiovascular Disease: Beyond Cholesterol
Jason Miller

Topical Applications for Pain
Jillian Stansbury
Thyroid Dysfunction
DavidWinston
Bridging Aromatherapy and Herbalism
Rhonda PallasDowney
11:00 AM -
11:30 AM
Refreshments/Exhibit Break
11:30 AM -
1:00 PM
Understanding Aging, Part 1
Donald Yance
Botanicals for Focus and Attention in Kids
Mary Bove
Nutritive Herbs
Paul Bergner
Osha: Bear Medicine of the Southwest
Feather Jones
1:00 PM -
2:00 PM
Lunch and Exhibit Break
2:00 PM -
3:30 PM
Understanding Aging, Part 2
Donald Yance
Useful Syndromes from Traditional Chinese Medicine
Paul Bergner
Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause
Katie Stage
Musculoskeletal Injuries: First Aid and Herbal Healing
Sam Coffman
3:30 PM -
4:00 PM
Refreshments/Exhibit Break
4:00 PM -
5:30 PM
Immune Modulating Botanicals and Drugs
Jeffrey Langland
Obesity Epidemic:
Hormonal and Metabolic Disruption
Kenneth Proefrock
Botanical Therapies for Migraines
David Winston
Making Flower and Plant Essences
Mimi Kamp
Herb Walk
Botanical Garden
Phyllis Hogan
($22 admission to garden)

5:30 PM -
6:30 PM
Dinner and Exhibit Break
7:00 PM -
8:30 PM
Panel: Botanicals and Immunotherapy in Cancer Therapeutics Jason Miller, Kenneth Proefrock and Donald Yance
SUNDAY MARCH 31
8:30 AM -
10:30 AM
Herb Walk
Botanical Garden
Mimi Kamp
($22 admission to garden)
9:00 AM -
10:30 AM
Pain and Inflammation
Jason Miller
Restoring Gut Health and Function
Mary Bove
Depression and Anxiety
David Winston
Wild Fermentation
John Slattery
10:30 AM -
11:00 AM
Refreshments/Exhibit Break
11:00 AM -
12:30 PM
Medication Induced Cognitive Decline
Kenneth Proefrock
Peripheral Neuropathy
Jillian Stansbury
BioFilms
Sam Coffman
Herbal Pairs
JoAnn Sanchez
12:30 PM -
1:30 PM
Lunch and Exhibit Break
2:00 PM -
3:30 PM
Botanical Mitigation of Acute Opiate Withdrawal
Jillian Stansbury
Bitter Herbs and a Healthy Microbiome
Mary Bove
Botanical Adulterants
Mark Blumenthal

Distillation of Essential Oils
Eric Scott Bresselsmith
3:30 PM -
4:00 PM
Refreshments/Exhibit Break
4:00 PM -
5:30 PM
Molds and Mycotoxins
Kenneth Proefrock
The Health Benefits of Chocolate
Katie Stage
Nutrition in the Herbal Paradigm
Paul Bergner
Drought Resistant Botanicals
Phyllis Hogan
5:30 PM -
5:45 PM
Closing Meeting
Online and phone registration are now closed. 
You are welcome to register at the door.
 

Phone 541-482-3016

We look forward to seeing you there!